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St John WA is committed to providing a high quality ambulance service for Western Australians.

The following information relates to ambulance activity in Western Australia. The data below directly corresponds to our response times and also the amount of time our ambulances are ramped at metropolitan hospitals.

Metropolitan response time statistics for 5 June 2020

Priority Average ambulance response time Target time to respond to 90% of cases Percentage of cases responded to within target time Number of cases attended
1 11.1 mins 15 mins 87.0% 285
2 15.0 mins 25 mins 86.7% 211
3 39.2 mins 60 mins 92.5% 120
Routine transport cases 293.9 mins N/A N/A 287
Total cases for the day: 903

Data represented above is derived from a real time data feed and may be subject to correction at a later date.

Frequently Asked Questions - Response Times

Q: How do we measure response time?
A: Response time is measured as the time from the call coming in to the St John WA State Operations Centre to when a St John Ambulance arrives at the scene.

Q: What are the response time targets?
A: Response times are a key indicator in measuring our performance. Our metropolitan response time targets are as follows:

  • Attend to 90 per cent of priority 1 (emergency) calls within 15 minutes
  • Attend to 90 per cent of priority 2 (urgent) calls within 25 minutes
  • Attend to 90 per cent of priority 3 (non-urgent) calls within 60 minutes

Q: How well is St John WA meeting these targets?
A: For 2018/19 we attended to:

  • 92 per cent of metropolitan priority 1 (emergency) calls within 15 minutes
  • 87.1 per cent of metropolitan priority 2 (urgent) calls within 25 minutes
  • 89.7 per cent of metropolitan priority 3 (non-urgent) calls within 60 minutes

In our 2019 CAA Patient Experience Survey, 96 percent of respondents said they were satisfied with our ambulance response times. Through Government commitment to our industry, we continue to see an increase in paramedic applications and investment in new ambulance vehicles.

Metropolitan ramping statistics for 5 June 2020

Hospital Name Dest Code Total Hours Ramped
ARMADALE/KELMSCOTT HOSP. AH 3.1
FIONA STANLEY HOSPITAL FSH 2.6
JOONDALUP HEALTH CAMPUS JHC 7.3
KING EDWARD MEMORIAL HOSPITAL KE 0.0
PEEL HEALTH CAMPUS PHC 0.3
PERTH CHILDRENS HOSPITAL PCH 0.0
ROCKINGHAM HOSPITAL (RKDH) RH 3.7
ROYAL PERTH HOSPITAL RPH 4.4
SIR CHARLES GAIRDNER HOSP QE2 14.9
ST JOHN OF GOD MIDLAND ST/JMD 5.5

Data represented above is derived from a real time data feed and may be subject to correction at a later date.

Frequently Asked Questions - Ramping

Q: What is Ramping?
A: The term 'ramping' is used to describe the time (in hours) that ambulances are parked outside a hospital, waiting to handover the care of the patient to Hospital clinicians.

Q: How is Ramping measured?
A: Efficient handover of a patient to Hospital clinician should take no more than 30 minutes. Ramping is measured as the time beyond 30 minutes that a patient is in the care of the Ambulance crew before being handed over to the care of Hospital clinicians. 

As part of the WA Department of Health’s commitment to the quality patient care and to align with national industry standards, some changes have been made to how ramping is measured and reported. The new methodology provides a more patient-focused measure of the quality and timeliness of service provided to the patient. It is also a more accurate representation of the time spent by an Ambulance crew waiting to handover a patient to Hospital clinicians. To enable an accurate comparison of figures and avoid a time-series break, the new methodology has been applied to both current and historical data.

Q: Why are we measuring ramping?
A: Increased hours of ramping can have a significant impact on response times. Measuring ramping does not in itself address the challenges that emergency health services organisations face, but it may assist in understanding the circumstances which contribute to it. With this intention, we measure and report on ramping to assess how our collaborative strategies with the WA Department of Health are improving outcomes for the community over time.